Our mission is to unite and align key diabetes stakeholders and the larger diabetes community around key
diabetes-related policy and legislative efforts in order to elevate diabetes on the national agenda.

In the News

World Health Organization Releases First Ever "Global Report on Diabetes"

April 7, 2016 – Today the World Health Organization (WHO) called on governments to take aggressive steps to fight the escalating worldwide diabetes epidemic. The WHO released their first "Global Report on Diabetes" which includes startling statistics such as that the number of people living with diabetes globally has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million, or approximately 8.5 percent of the total world population. The report also estimates worldwide costs of diabetes to our health care systems are $827 billion each year. View Report


Diabetes Advocacy Alliance Supports $25 million for National Diabetes Prevention Program

Seventeen members of the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) wrote to House and Senate Appropriators on March 2nd urging them to provide $25 million for the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in fiscal year (FY) 2017. The DAA sent the letter because the House and Senate Appropriations Committees have recently begun deliberations on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (LHHS) appropriations for FY17. The National DPP is a public-private partnership administered by the CDC which seeks to reduce the growing problem of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in the United States. The National DPP provides an evidence-based solution for the 86 million Americans with prediabetes in the United States. View DAA letter.


Diabetes Advocacy Alliance Statement on the Departure of AHRQ Director Richard Kronick

On February 24th, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Director Dr. Richard Kronick will be leaving his position in mid-March 2016. The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) was saddened to hear the news about Dr. Kronick’s departure and would like to express our deep appreciation for his service and commitment to improving our nation’s health.

Dr. Kronick’s leadership at AHRQ since 2013 has helped advance the Agency’s mission to produce evidence that makes health care safer, of higher quality, and more accessible, equitable and affordable. The DAA has worked closely with AHRQ over the last several years as the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reviewed and released a much improved guideline for the screening of abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes. The new guideline will have a significant impact on efforts to refer at risk patients to lifestyle intervention, detect diabetes early, and prevent the disease’s devastating complications. The diabetes community is indebted to Dr. Kronick for his leadership and commitment to this issue.

The DAA thanks Dr. Kronick for his years of service and contributions to building a better health care system. We wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors and look forward to continuing our work with AHRQ, including Dr. Sharon Arnold who will become the acting director.


ADA, AMA and CDC sponsor new Ad Council media campaign designed to increase public awareness of prediabetes and increase screenings and referrals

On January 21, 2016, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the Ad Council, launched a new, long-term, first-of-its-kind national prediabetes public service advertising campaign. This national effort will help increase awareness of prediabetes and encourage people to find out where they stand by taking an online prediabetes risk test and talking with their doctor.

The ADA and AMA are members of the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA), and this new Ad Council campaign aligns well with the DAA’s 2016 Advocacy Priorities, which include support for policies and legislation that would increase access for people with prediabetes to diabetes prevention programs and medical nutrition therapy, as well as increase funding for the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the CDC.

The campaign will use a multi-faceted approach to reach millions of adults ages 40 to 60 across the country including national media coverage, creative television and radio commercials, billboard and online advertisements, and social media promotion, as well as a text messaging program (all translated in both English and Spanish). The dedicated bilingual website for the campaign houses a variety of valuable assets including the interactive prediabetes risk test, healthy living tips and other important information.


ADA and AACE/ACE Separately Release New Medical Guidelines for Diabetes

(January 7, 2016) -- Several leading diabetes organizations have recently released their own newly updated medical guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. In late-December, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) released their 2016 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. The evidence-based guidelines, updated annually, provide health care providers, patients, researchers, payers and other interested individuals with all components of diabetes care, general treatment goals, and tools to evaluate quality care. The new 2016 standards contain one particularly noteworthy update: obesity management recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. View ADA’s 2016 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes.

In addition, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinology (AACE) in conjunction with the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) published its 2016 update of the AACE/ACE Comprehensive Diabetes Management Algorithm in early-January. The algorithm provides a clinical guide for physicians managing the care of patients with type 2 diabetes. The updated version considers new therapies, disease management approaches and key clinical data resulting in several important additions including a new section on lifestyle therapy optimization. View AACE/ACE Comprehensive Diabetes Management Algorithm.


President Obama signs budget legislation that includes a doubling of funding, to $20 million, for the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

(December 21, 2015) The federal budget legislation that Congress passed and the President signed on December 18, 2015 includes good news for the many millions of Americans with diabetes or at risk for the disease. The new budget doubles funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), rising from $10 to $20 million, and provides overall for a $30 million increase for the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, now funded at $170 million. Additionally, the legislation includes an increase of $68 million to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), bringing its budget to more than $1.8 billion.

Members of the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) have long advocated for the National DPP and its continued funding will remain a DAA Advocacy Priority for 2016.


In a new infograph, DAA outlines the problem and describes potential solutions to the many challenges posed by millions of American adults with diabetes and prediabetes who are aging into Medicare

(December 1, 2015) Each year for the next 13 years, millions of Baby Boomers will reach age 65 and become eligible for Medicare, and 3 of every 4 of them will have either diabetes (26%) or prediabetes (51%).

In a new infograph entitled “The Diabetes Burden on Medicare – How We Can Reduce It,” the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) outlines the challenges these Boomers are likely to face in transitioning into Medicare, and describes some policy solutions that DAA members support to help reduce the diabetes burden on Medicare.

Click here to download a PDF of this new infograph.


US Preventive Services Task Force’s final diabetes screening guideline, issued on October 26, 2015, retreats significantly from its draft guideline issued in 2014

(October 27, 2015) In its final diabetes screening guideline released on October 26, 2015, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) significantly narrowed the population that it says should be screened for diabetes, as compared with what was stated in its draft screening guideline published in 2014. The DAA issued a press statement today that is available here.

The final recommendation states:

  • The USPSTF recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose as part of cardiovascular risk assessment in adults aged 40 to 70 years who are overweight or obese. Clinicians should offer or refer patients with abnormal glucose to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity. (B recommendation)

This recommendation leaves out critical diabetes risk factors, which include race/ethnicity, family history, and previous gestational diabetes. It also appears to minimize the value of screening for identifying adults who have undiagnosed diabetes, a population at least as large as 8.1 million people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2014. It also frames diabetes solely in terms of cardiovascular disease risk reduction, which seems to minimize the importance of providing treatment and care to help reduce the small blood vessel complications of diabetes, such as blindness, kidney disease, and amputations.

The final guideline improves upon the USPSTF’s 2008 guideline in two ways:

  • The 2008 guideline had limited the population to be screened to only adults with high blood pressure.
  • The 2015 final recommendation encourages clinicians to offer or refer their patients with prediabetes to programs that could help them prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, such as those recognized by CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program.


Social media lights up on October 7, 2015, with message from constituents of DAA member organizations, asking Congress for a hearing on diabetes

For the past few months, representatives from various DAA member organizations have been advocating on the Hill for a congressional hearing on diabetes during November 2015. The last diabetes hearing was held on July 10, 2010: "The Battle Against Diabetes: Progress Made, Challenges Unmet." That hearing examined advances in research into type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as other related public health efforts. It explored the then-current understanding of the causes and consequences of diabetes, as well as evidence-based prevention and management strategies. A transcript of that 2010 hearing is available here.

Now, DAA members believe the time has come for another focused look at this disease that directly affects 29.1 million Americans and another 86 million adults who have prediabetes and are therefore at high risk of developing diabetes.

On October 7, 2015, diabetes advocates across America took to their social media accounts and sent messages to their members of Congress, asking them to "hear our voices" and schedule a hearing on diabetes. Advocates unified their messages under and around the hashtag #hearingdiabetesvoices. Here's one story about these efforts:

http://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/congressional-diabetes-hearing

A Congressional diabetes hearing would raise the visibility of specific pieces of legislation that, if passed, would benefit people with diabetes and prediabetes. See the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance's Advocacy Priorities in 2015 for information about legislation that would help ensure:

  • For people in Medicare who have diabetes, access to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and diabetes education from certified diabetes educators (CDEs)
  • For people in Medicare who have prediabetes, access to medical nutrition therapy, and diabetes prevention programs
  • Funding for research, education and programs within racial and ethic minority groups
  • Funding for research for gestational diabetes
  • Federal agency coordination in support of diabetes research and programs


Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group publishes 15-year follow-up data, showing lifestyle intervention still effective, with 27% reduction in risk

The Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group has published an article online - first in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology (September 13, 2015) - that provides powerful evidence of the long-lasting effects of lifestyle intervention to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

After 15 years of follow-up of participants in the original Diabetes Prevention Program clinical trial, cases of new type 2 diabetes were 27% lower in the adults in the original lifestyle intervention compared with those in the placebo group. New cases of type 2 diabetes were 18% lower in those adults taking the drug metformin, compared with placebo.

According to a Reuters news article by Kathryn Doyle:

  • "'The lifestyle intervention was more powerful in preventing or delaying diabetes development during the original three-year Diabetes Prevention Program and remains more powerful over the entire 15-year study,' said professor David M. Nathan of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, a coauthor of the new paper."
  • "'However, there are specific subgroups in which the lifestyle intervention had an even more powerful effect – specifically, those older than age 60,' Nathan told Reuters Health by email. Metformin was relatively more effective in people younger than 60 and those who were more obese, he said."


New analysis shows as many as 12-14% of US adults have diabetes and an additional 36.5-38% have prediabetes, underscoring urgent need for action

(September 8, 2015) Data on the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes among US adults, reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association, underscore the need for urgent action to prevent diabetes from occurring, and to identify and treat those with diabetes to help prevent the long-term complications of the disease. The article is available here.

Highlights of the research include:

  • From 2011 to 2012, between 12% and 14% of US adults had diabetes, depending on what criteria were used to diagnose them. This percentage has remained stable since 2008.
  • About half of all Americans have diabetes or prediabetes (12-14% with diabetes; 36.5-38% with prediabetes). Among adults aged 65 and older, about 1 of every 3 has diabetes, and 83% have either diabetes or prediabetes.
  • The proportion of people who had diabetes without knowing it decreased from 40.3% in 1998-1994 to 31% in 2011-2012.
  • This decrease was not seen across all racial and ethnic groups. The proportion of Mexican Americans who were undiagnosed was higher than their white and black counterparts, and this percentage did not decrease over time. The authors suggest this result may be due to a lower percentage of Mexican Americans with health insurance, leading to lower access to healthcare.
  • The authors also found that Asian Americans were more likely than any other racial group to have undiagnosed diabetes.
  • Although diabetes prevalence increased between 1988-1994 and 2011-2012, prevalence plateaued between 2007-2008 and 2011-2012. The authors note that: “This plateauing of diabetes prevalence is consistent with obesity trends in the United States showing a leveling off around the same period.”
  • More than half of non-Hispanic Asian participants had not been previously diagnosed. Overall, 10.6% of Asian participants were estimated to have had undiagnosed diabetes using the hemoglobin A1c test, a percentage which was higher than that for any other racial/ethnic group. According to the authors, this higher rate may partly be due to less frequent screening for diabetes because Asian individuals on average have lower BMIs. (The American Diabetes Association recommends Asian Americans get tested for diabetes at a BMI of 23 or higher, a lower BMI threshold than that for the general population.)

According to the study's senior author, Catherine Cowie, Ph.D., director of diabetes epidemiology programs at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at NIH, "The large proportion of people with undiagnosed diabetes points to both a greater need to test for type 2 diabetes and a need for more education on when to test for type 2 diabetes…”


American Diabetes Association publishes new infograph that shows the “staggering cost of diabetes”

(August 4, 2015) The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently published a new infograph that graphically portrays the devastating and unsustainable human and financial costs attributed to diabetes.

Entitled “The Staggering Cost of Diabetes,” this new infograph makes a brief yet compelling case for how diabetes impacts the US and underscores why actions to help prevent diabetes and its complications are so urgently needed. You can access this infograph here.


The CDC releases 2014 Diabetes Report Card

The CDC released its 2014 Diabetes Report Card on July 28, 2015. The CDC updates the Report Card every 2 years to provide current information on the status of diabetes in the United States. It includes the most recent information and data available about diabetes, gestational diabetes, prediabetes, preventive care practices, risk factors, quality of care, diabetes outcomes, as well as national and state trends.

Highlights from the 2014 Report Card include the following:

  • Over the past 32 years, from 1980 through 2012, the number of adults with diagnosed diabetes in the United States nearly quadrupled, from 5.5 million to 21.3 million.
  • The diabetes and obesity epidemics, combined with longer life spans, have increased the lifetime risk of developing diabetes to about 40% for US adults.
  • During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes.
  • According to the CDC, “The increasing frequency of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth has been among the most concerning aspects of the diabetes epidemic.” They estimate that more than 18,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes and more than 5,000 cases of type 2 diabetes will be diagnosed among US youth younger than age 20 each year.
  • The CDC states “diabetes self-management education (DSME) connects people with diabetes educators who can teach them the problem-solving and coping skills they need to successfully self-manage diabetes and its complications.” However, only 57.6% of adults aged 18 and older with diagnosed diabetes report that they have ever attended a DSME class. The Healthy People 2020 target for this preventive care practice is 62.5%.
  • On a more positive note, the rates of five major diabetes complications—heart attack, stroke, amputations of the legs and feet, end-stage renal disease, and deaths due to high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) crisis—all declined in adults with diagnosed diabetes during 1990-2010. However, people with diabetes are living longer with the disease and its complications.

The Report Card also highlights recent updates in federal preventive care guidelines that have the potential to improve efforts nationwide to address the diabetes epidemic, if adopted.

  • In July 2014, the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommended combined diet and physical activity promotion programs for people at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and newly diagnosed diabetes as an effective and cost-effective intervention for diabetes prevention and control.
  • In October 2014, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a draft, updated screening recommendation for type 2 diabetes, recommending screening for adults with risk factors for prediabetes and diabetes, including being age 45 or older; being overweight or obese; or having a first-degree relative with diabetes; women with a history of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome; and certain racial and ethnic minority groups, including African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders.
  • USPSTF now also recommends screening all adults for obesity:
    • Offering or referring adults who are overweight or obese and have additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention; and
    • Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in asymptomatic pregnant women after 24 weeks of gestation.

The Report Card includes a number of examples of diabetes prevention success stories. You can access the 2014 Diabetes Report Card here.


DAA participates in HHS Healthy Aging Summit, July 27-28, 2015, at Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC; advocates for needs of seniors who have diabetes and prediabetes and are entering into or are already covered by Medicare

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hosted a two-day Healthy Aging Summit in Washington, DC, on July 27-28, 2015.

According the Summit’s Web site, the goals of the summit were to:

  1. Explore the science on healthy aging;
  2. Identify knowledge gaps that need to be filled;
  3. Promote the role of prevention and preventive services in improving quality of life in later years; and
  4. Mobilize action to improve the delivery of care for those aging in place or in transition.

In addition to health care clinicians and public health professionals, HHS sought a broader audience for this Summit, to include “experts across sectors including transportation, environment, housing, justice, and faith-based partners, to name a few.”

The DAA prepared and presented a 4’ X 6’ poster, which can be viewed here, that dramatically helped raise awareness of issues of concern to patients with diabetes and prediabetes who are entering into Medicare. Some patients face challenges with insurance reimbursement for education, equipment and supplies to which they had access prior to entering into Medicare.

That’s why DAA members are seeking Congressional support for these pieces of legislation:

  • The Medicare CGM Access Act of 2015 (H.R. 1427/S. 804). CGM is continuous glucose monitoring. It is technology that is especially useful for helping prevent episodes of very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that can lead to hospitalizations and even death.
  • The Access to Quality Diabetes Education Act of 2015 (H.R. 1726/S. 1345) would provide seniors in Medicare greater access to diabetes self-management training (DSMT) by designating qualified and credentialed diabetes educators as Medicare providers of DSMT.
  • The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act (H.R. 2102/S. 1131) would expand the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and would make community-based and online diabetes prevention programs that achieve CDC recognition a covered benefit under Medicare, to help seniors prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.
  • The Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act (H.R. 1686) would allow Medicare to reimburse registered dietitians or other qualified nutrition professionals to provide medical nutrition therapy (MNT) to patients with prediabetes or other diabetes risk factors, in addition to patients with diabetes and renal disease.

Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends diabetes prevention programs; cites systematic reviews showing clear health and economic benefits

On July 14, 2015, Annals of Internal Medicine published four important new articles related to diabetes prevention. These articles contain more data underscoring the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of diabetes prevention programs, such as those recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program.

According to the Community Preventive Services Task Force’s (CPSTF) Recommendation Statement:

  • “The Task Force recommends combined diet and physical activity promotion programs for persons at increased risk for type 2 diabetes on the basis of strong evidence of effectiveness in reducing new-onset diabetes. . . These programs are effective across a range of counseling intensities, settings, and implementers.
  • Economic evidence indicates that such programs aimed at preventing type 2 diabetes among persons at increased risk are cost-effective.”

According to Dr. Ronald Ackermann’s accompanying editorial in the journal, the time has come for action on diabetes prevention:

“As a society, we should no longer hold for ransom the potential to reduce the burden of diabetes by continuing to await further evidence that interventions will be cost-saving or prevent myocardial infarctions or deaths. It is imperative that we promote a known cost-effective intervention that improves health, reduces the need for medication, and has the potential to enable millions of Americans to evade a remaining lifetime burdened by the daily management of diabetes.”

The four articles are listed below with links to where they can be found on the Annals Web site:

  1. Combined Diet and Physical Activity Promotion Programs for Prevention of Diabetes: Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
  2. Combined Diet and Physical Activity Promotion Programs to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Among Persons at Increased Risk: A Systematic Review for the Community Preventive Services Task Force
  3. Economic Evaluation of Combined Diet and Physical Activity Promotion Programs to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Among Persons at Increased Risk: A Systematic Review for the Community Preventive Services Task Force
  4. Diabetes Prevention at the Tipping Point: Aligning Clinical and Public Health Recommendations (an editorial by Ronald T. Ackermann, MD, MPH

The impact of diabetes continues to grow; prevalence, costs on the rise, while health consequences loom from head to toe

On July 14, 2015, the DAA posted an updated version of its infographic fact sheet entitled “The gateway disease: health consequences of diabetes in America.” This new version is available as the first offering on the Advocacy Briefs page of this Web site.

While the prevalence and costs associated with diabetes, prediabetes and gestational diabetes continue to grow, evidence of the impact of diabetes on the body “from head to toe” also mounts.


Patients who know their prediabetes status are more likely to be engaged in diabetes prevention behaviors, according to new study posted online by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

A new study published online-first on June 16, 2015 by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) supports the importance of screening asymptomatic adults to identify those who have prediabetes.

Adults who were aware they had prediabetes were more likely to report engaging in behaviors to lose weight and increase their physical activity levels, as compared with adults with prediabetes who were unaware of their status.

This study underscores the importance of screening asymptomatic adults at risk for diabetes and communicating their blood test results to them. The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance has long advocated for expanded diabetes screening guidelines, and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued new draft diabetes screening guidelines (in October 2014) that support screening for prediabetes.


On June 5, 2015, Three Diabetes Advocacy Alliance Members (AADE, ADA, AND) Release New Joint Position Statement on Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support in Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), American Diabetes Association (ADA), and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) released a new joint Position Statement that addresses when and how diabetes self-management education and support should be provided to patients with type 2 diabetes. The Position Statement was made available on June 5, 2015, during the ADA’s 75th Annual Scientific Sessions meeting in Boston.

According to a news release issued by the ADA:

“Research has shown that diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) improves diabetes outcomes, including helping to reduce A1C levels; reducing the onset and/or advancement of diabetes complications; improving lifestyle behaviors, such as eating a more healthful diet and exercising more frequently; and decreasing diabetes-related distress and depression. Studies have also shown it to be cost effective by reducing hospital admissions and readmissions.”

“Specifically, the statement highlights four critical times for assessing the need for DSME/S referral: at diagnosis; on an annual basis; when new complicating factors influence self-management and, lastly, when transitions in care occur. The statement also provides guidance on the type of information and support patients might need at these critical junctures.”

The statement was published online concurrently in The Diabetes Educator, Diabetes Care, and the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


USPSTF Evidence Review and Editorial that Supports Diabetes Screening Published in June 2, 2015 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine

An editorial published in the June 2, 2015 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine presents strong arguments for screening adults without symptoms for prediabetes and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. This editorial was prepared as a commentary related to the publication in Annals of Internal Medicine (also in the June 2, 2015 issue) of the systematic review of the evidence for diabetes screening, conducted for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

K.M. Venkat Narayan, MD, and Mary Beth Weber, PhD, both of the Emory Global Diabetes Research Center and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, put forth their views as to why diabetes screening is so valuable in an editorial entitled “Screening for Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose): The Gateway to Diabetes Prevention and Management for All Americans.”

Some selected content from their editorial:

“A national policy to screen all persons at high risk for diabetes (closer to the American Diabetes Association policy) would help identify those with undetected diabetes and prediabetes.”

“The strong evidence backing diabetes prevention unequivocally calls for aggressive implementation, and adequate integration of community and clinic resources and infrastructure for delivery of effective lifestyle interventions are imperatively needed.”

“Detection of prediabetes and diabetes would offer a strategic window of opportunity to intervene on other CVD risk factors in an integrated manner. Without screening, 90% of prediabetes cases will remain undetected, and we will continue to miss the opportunity to aggressively implement strategies to prevent diabetes and remain unable to slow the growing costs of managing diabetes and its complications.”


Participants in Omada Health’s Prevent program show sustained weight loss and A1c reductions after two years

Research published online in the Journal of Medical Internet Research shows positive two-year results for participants in Omada Health’s Web-based Prevent program, which is based on the landmark NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program clinical trial.

According to Omada Health’s news release, “Prevent participants achieved an 4.7 percent average weight loss after one year, maintaining a 4.2 percent average weight loss after two years. This degree of weight maintenance following weight loss is unusual among translations of the diabetes prevention program, and speaks to the power of Prevent’s ongoing engagement levels during the second year. Even more encouraging, the study showed a sustained and clinically meaningful reduction in hemoglobin A1c, a key marker of average blood sugar and diabetes progression, after two years.

Prevent users, on average, moved from levels associated with prediabetes into a range associated with normal blood sugar levels. Prevent participants also exceeded Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) benchmarks for engagement and program completion. These results are clinically meaningful, since a previously published study on the original diabetes prevention program’s intensive behavioral counseling intervention showed that two-year weight loss was the strongest predictor of reduced diabetes risk and improvements in cardiometabolic traits.”


American Diabetes Association Encourages People to Learn about Their Risk for Diabetes.

On March 24, 2015 – American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, -- the Association issued a "wake-up call" asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. ADA is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year and continues to focus on ensuring that the public is aware of their risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The campaign will run through April 21, 2015. Americans are urged to take the risk test at diabetes.org/alert and start living a healthy and active lifestyle.

According to the Association's news release, "The Diabetes Risk Test requires users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risk factors for diabetes. Their results are reported as a numerical score indicating low or high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Those at higher risk are encouraged to speak with their health care provider to learn more about ways to help reduce their risk or delay onset of the disease."


National Diabetes Education Program hosted webinar on Jan. 21, 2015, on results of the DAWN2 survey (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs)

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hosted a webinar on January 21, 2015 that provided details of the DAWN2 (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes, and Needs) survey. Two of the survey's principal investigators presented survey results. Webinar participants learned about the psychosocial needs of people with diabetes, as well as gained insights into attitudes and beliefs of family caregivers and health care professionals.

The NDEP Webinar is now archived on the NDEP's Web site and is available here.

DAWN2TM is a global study conducted in collaboration with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the International Alliance of Patient Organizations (IAPO), the Steno Diabetes Center and a range of other national, regional and global partners. Novo Nordisk Inc. provided support for the study.

From an e-mail message from the National Diabetes Education Program that promoted attendance for the webinar:

"Findings from the first Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) study initiated in 2001 showed that diabetes care and self-management were considered inadequate by people with diabetes and health care professionals. Diabetes experts and researchers launched the DAWN2 study in 2011 to examine the unmet needs of people with diabetes, their family members, and health care providers, building on the experience gained by researchers in the behavioral and psychological sciences since the first DAWN study. The aim of DAWN2 was to increase understanding of each group's needs and foster dialogue about improving patient involvement, enhancing self-management practices, and providing psychosocial support.

During this webinar, Mark Peyrot, PhD, principal investigator for the DAWN2 study and Martha M. Funnell, MS, RN, CDE, FAADE, member of the DAWN2 Study Group, will summarize key findings from the DAWN2 study and describe implications of the U.S. findings that are relevant to health care practices. The presenters will also explore practical strategies that health care teams can use to address psychosocial issues with their patients."


Lifestyle intervention among people with prediabetes produces long-term health and societal benefits that exceed anticipated intervention costs

According to new research published online in December 2014 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, investments in lifestyle change programs to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes can bring health benefits to adults with prediabetes and also be cost effective over a 10-year period.

The journal article is entitled "Value of Lifestyle Intervention to Prevent Diabetes and Sequelae" and the research was led by Timothy Dall of IHS Life Sciences. Dall and his team used Markov modeling techniques to examine a nationally representative sample of adults with prediabetes.

Researchers estimated the gross economic benefits, over 10 years, of treating adults with prediabetes with a lifestyle intervention program designed to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. They modeled disease outcomes and costs for two sub-populations of adults with prediabetes: Those who met the 2014 screening criteria of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and those who met the 2008 screening criteria* of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). For purposes of comparison, they also modeled the entire population of adults with prediabetes.

  • Over 10 years, estimated average cumulative gross economic benefits of treating adults with prediabetes patients who met diabetes screening criteria recommended by the ADA ($26,800) or USPSTF ($24,700) exceeded average benefits from treating the entire prediabetes population ($17,800).
  • Estimated cumulative, gross medical savings for these three populations averaged $10,400 (ADA), $11,200 (USPSTF), and $6,300 (all).
  • Published estimates suggest that opportunistic screening for prediabetes is inexpensive, and lifestyle intervention similar to the Diabetes Prevention Program can be achieved for less than or equal to $2,300 over 10 years.

The economic benefits of lifestyle intervention among a population with prediabetes grow over time. Simulation results suggest that for the population with prediabetes that meets the ADA's screening guidelines, achieving average Diabetes Prevention Program results could reduce annual medical expenditures by about $500/year in the first year and grow to $2400/year by year 10. Findings not published in this paper suggest that benefits continue well beyond 10 years (especially among younger and middle-aged populations participating in lifestyle intervention).

In simulations, lifestyle intervention was cost-effective over 10 years for all the populations modeled. For the population age 75 and older, however, the average benefits of lifestyle intervention are smaller than for younger populations modeled because there is a shorter remaining lifespan to reap the benefits of intervention.

The researchers concluded:

"Lifestyle intervention among people with prediabetes produces long-term societal benefits that exceed anticipated intervention costs, especially among prediabetes patients that meet the (2014) ADA and (2008) USPSTF screening guidelines."

Implications

In October 2014, the USPSTF released a draft of new guidelines for diabetes and prediabetes screening that covers a much broader population with prediabetes compared to the USPSTF's 2008 guidelines. Analyses conducted subsequent to the research published in this paper suggest that the economic value of lifestyle intervention for the at-risk populations identified under the new USPSTF draft guidelines will be similar to the value for the population examined in this study that met the ADA's current screening guidelines.

Also, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 90% of people with prediabetes are unaware they have elevated blood glucose levels. This study underscores the importance of identifying these people so they can receive appropriate counseling and treatment. Study findings help quantify something that physicians already know—that if overweight and obese patients with prediabetes make modest lifestyle changes now it can prevent or delay onset of diabetes and cardiovascular disease which leads to better health and quality of life in future years. In its new draft guideline for screening for diabetes and prediabetes, the USPSTF recommends intensive lifestyle interventions as "first line therapy" for people with prediabetes.

*This research was conducted, analyzed, and submitted for publication prior to the USPSTF's posting of a new draft diabetes screening guideline in October 2014.


Total Cost of Diabetes Estimated at $322 Billion, with a 48% Increase Seen between 2007 and 2012

According to new research published in the December 2014 issue of Diabetes Care, the total cost of diabetes in 2012 was $322 billion, increasing 48% from a figure of $218 billion in 2007.

  • The $322 billion grand total cost is comprised of medical expenditures and reduced productivity for diagnosed diabetes ($244 billion), undiagnosed diabetes ($33 billion), prediabetes ($44 billion), and gestational diabetes mellitus ($1.3 billion).
  • Strikingly, over that 5-year period, costs were up 40% for diagnosed diabetes, 82% for undiagnosed diabetes, and 76% for prediabetes.
  • The average annual economic burden of diabetes on each individual American is now approximately $1,000.
  • When expressed as the average annual burden for each person with diagnosed diabetes, costs have increased by 10%, rising from $9,975 in 2007 to $10,970 in 2012.
  • Cost and prevalence data are also available by state.

The journal article is entitled "The total economic burden of elevated blood glucose levels in 2012: diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, gestational diabetes, and prediabetes." You can find the abstract here

This issue of Diabetes Care also contains an accompanying editorial that makes a strong plea for urgent action in diabetes prevention in light of these escalating costs, especially those for undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. You can find the abstract here


Webinar on November 13, 2014, to Address Mobile Health and Interactive Technologies in Diabetes

To help self-manage their disease and increase interaction with health care providers, people with diabetes are using interactive and mobile technologies. The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance and Healthy People 2020 are co-sponsoring a webinar on November 13, 2014, to increase awareness of what's working and what's available for patients and health care providers. Learn from a leading researcher in the field and hear from representatives of the American Diabetes Association, Endocrine Society, and American Association of Diabetes Educators about innovative products that are available free of charge. Register here today.


DAA applauds new USPSTF draft diabetes screening recommendation that urges screening for prediabetes and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in adults at increased risk

On October 6, 2014, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) posted a draft of its new recommendation for screening asymptomatic adults for diabetes, for which the DAA expressed its enthusiastic support in a press statement released on October 9, 2014.

"The USPSTF recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults who are at increased risk for diabetes. (Grade B) This recommendation applies to adults in primary care settings with known risk factors for impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or diabetes. Risk factors include age of 45 years or older, overweight or obesity, or a first-degree relative with diabetes. Women with a history of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome are also at increased risk. Certain racial/ethnic minorities, including African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, are also at increased risk compared with whites."

The USPSTF's new draft recommendation also recognizes the use of the A1c test for screening purposes, adding it as an option in addition to use of impaired fasting glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests.


DAA applauds new USPSTF draft diabetes screening recommendation that urges screening for prediabetes and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in adults at increased risk

On October 6, 2014, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) posted a draft of its new recommendation for screening asymptomatic adults for diabetes.

"The USPSTF recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults who are at increased risk for diabetes. (Grade B) This recommendation applies to adults in primary care settings with known risk factors for impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or diabetes. Risk factors include age of 45 years or older, overweight or obesity, or a first-degree relative with diabetes. Women with a history of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome are also at increased risk. Certain racial/ethnic minorities, including African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, are also at increased risk compared with whites."

The USPSTF's new draft recommendation also recognizes the use of the A1c test for screening purposes, adding it as an option in addition to use of impaired fasting glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests.

What This New Recommendation Means

  • Less confusion about who should be screened for prediabetes and diabetes, as the new USPSTF recommendation aligns closely with that of the American Diabetes Association
  • Insurance coverage of the cost of the diabetes screening test for millions more American adults at risk for diabetes
  • Recognition that there is value in screening for prediabetes and consequently more opportunities to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, as primary care practitioners identify, counsel and refer patients to prevention programs recognized by the CDC through its National Diabetes Prevention Program
  • More adults with undiagnosed diabetes could ultimately be identified and begin treatment to prevent complications and improve quality of life

The DAA and some DAA members plan to submit comments to the USPSTF prior to the comment period deadline of November 3, 2014.


Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends diabetes prevention programs; acknowledges "strong or sufficient" evidence that intervention is effective.

The U.S. Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) has reviewed the evidence for community-based diabetes prevention programs and has issued a recommendation in favor of these programs. A recommendation from this prestigious group should greatly enhance efforts to develop diabetes prevention programs in communities across the U.S., to help as many of the 86 million adults with prediabetes as possible.

According to the group's Web site, a recommendation means the following:

  • "The systematic review of available studies provides strong or sufficient evidence that the intervention is effective. The categories of "strong" and "sufficient" evidence reflect the Task Force's degree of confidence that an intervention has beneficial effects."

The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance has long advocated for funding for the CDC's National Diabetes Prevention Program, and is pleased that the CPSTF has acknowledged the value of efforts in communities across the U.S. to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.


New study shows people born between 2000-2011 have 40% chance of developing diabetes in their lifetimes.

Recently, the journal The Lancet: Diabetes and Endocrinology, published an article by Ed Gregg and fellow scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) entitled, "Trends in lifetime risks and years of life lost due to diabetes in the USA, 1985-2011: a modeling study."1 Highlights of this research:

  • The study included diabetes incidence data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and linked it with mortality data. Using a Markov model, the researchers estimated the lifetime risk for diabetes; years spent living with/without diagnosed diabetes; and life-years lost to diabetes.
  • Overall, Americans born between 2000 and 2011 have a 40% probability of developing diabetes during their lifetime.
  • Lifetime risk of developing diagnosed diabetes was 40.2% for men and 39.6% for women from 2000 to 2011, an increase of 20% and 13%, respectively, since 1985-1989.
  • The lifetime risk exceeds 50% for non-Hispanic black women and Hispanic men and women, and is 45% for black men.
  • The number of life years lost to diabetes decreased for both men and women over the time period, highlighting successes in diabetes care.
  • Years spent living with diabetes increased by 156% in men and 70% in women. "The average man diagnosed at age 40 years spends 33.8 years with the disease, whereas the average woman diagnosed at 40 spends 37.4 years with the disease."
  • According to the authors: "These findings predict a continuation of the position of diabetes as one of the central chronic disease threats to the US population, and of its contribution to wide-ranging morbidity and high use of health care resources."

Click here to view the abstract for this publication.

1 Gregg EW, Zhuo X, Cheng YJ, Albright AL, Narayan KMV, Thompson TJ. Trends in lifetime risk and years of life lost due to diabetes in the USA, 1985-2011: a modeling study. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2014; doi:10.1016/S2213-8587(14)70161-5.


Broad use of American Diabetes Association screening guidelines could give millions more the chance to prevent diabetes or get early diabetes treatment.

New Research in Population Health Metrics Compares ADA Guidelines with USPSTF Guidelines for Identifying the Undiagnosed

Washington, D.C., May 14, 2014 – According to the results of new research published online in Population Health Metrics, millions more American adults with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes could be identified using American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for diabetes screening compared with using current screening guidelines of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

Researchers calculated that in the year 2010, 59.1 million adults would have met the USPSTF screening criteria, and that among this population there were 24.4 million with undetected prediabetes and 3.7 million with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. In comparison, the study showed that among the 86.3 million adults who would have met ADA screening criteria, there were 33.9 million with undetected prediabetes and 4.6 million with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. ADA guidelines, when compared with USPSTF guidelines, detected 39% more cases of prediabetes and 24% more cases of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.

While the USPSTF recommends diabetes screening only for asymptomatic adults with high blood pressure, ADA's guidelines include multiple risk factors in addition to high blood pressure, including overweight and obesity, age, race/ethnicity, and family history, among others.

"This research is an important addition to the literature on diabetes screening," said study co-author Dr. K.M Venkat Narayan, Ruth and OC Hubert Professor of Global Health & Epidemiology and Professor of Medicine, Emory University. "It shows that one set of screening guidelines – those of the ADA – is more robust at identifying adults with prediabetes, which is a vital first step if we are to make serious progress as a country in providing counsel and community-based support for preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes." According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011, there are 79 million adults aged 20 and older with prediabetes, and research has shown that only about 11% of them are aware of their condition.

The Population Health Metrics study also shows that ADA screening guidelines are more robust at identifying adults with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes – a critical step on the path to treating the disease earlier in its progression, to improve chances of preventing the serious complications of diabetes. According to the CDC, there are approximately 7 million adults with undiagnosed diabetes.

Even better performance of the ADA guidelines was seen in an analysis of subgroups by age and race/ethnicity, where ADA guidelines would detect 78% more cases of diabetes among adults aged 54 and younger, 40% more cases in African Americans, and more than twice as many cases in Hispanic Americans.

Under a provision of the Affordable Care Act, insurers are required to cover, at no cost to the patient, preventive services that have been recommended by the USPSTF. USPSTF screening guidelines more closely aligned with those of the ADA would mean that millions of previously uninsured adults, who are now insured via the health insurance exchanges or through expansions of Medicaid, could be eligible for no-cost diabetes screenings.

Members of the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) have long supported screening as integral to their support of the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and they continue to urge Congress to increase funding for this vital effort that is bringing evidence-based diabetes prevention programs to communities across America. The DAA also supports policies and legislation that would improve diabetes treatment and care, recognizing screening as the vital first step.

"There is a strong scientific evidence base for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes, as well as for the value of early intervention in diabetes treatment for prevention of long-term complications of the disease," said DAA co-chair Tricia Brooks, Senior Director, Public Affairs Strategy and Public Policy, Novo Nordisk Inc. "But we can't prevent type 2 diabetes or its complications if we don't effectively screen for the disease."

Whether ADA or USPSTF screening guidelines are followed is not the only challenge to more effective screening in clinical settings. According to the study, the majority of adults meeting ADA (58%) and USPSTF (70%) screening guidelines had one or more primary care office visits in 2010, indicating they had access to care yet still had not been diagnosed. For the others who had no visits to a primary care office, access to care could be a contributing factor to a lack of diagnosis.

The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance™ (DAA) is a coalition of 20 members, representing patient, professional and trade associations, other nonprofit organizations, and corporations, all united in the desire to change the way diabetes is viewed and treated in America. The DAA was formed and began activities in January 2010. Three members of the DAA serve as co-chairs: Academy for Nutrition and Dietetics; American Diabetes Association; and Novo Nordisk Inc. More information is available at www.diabetesadvocacyalliance.org.

Novo Nordisk Inc. commissioned the study


The American Optometric Association (AOA) released new evidence-based eye care guidelines for patients with diabetes at a Congressional hearing on April 29, 2014.

The American Optometric Association (AOA) released new evidence-based eye care guidelines for patients with diabetes at a Congressional hearing on April 29, 2014. According to the AOA, these guidelines replace those created in 1993 and updated in 2009, and differ in that they are evidence-based versus developed through consensus opinion of experts in eye care. In creating these new guidelines, AOA followed Institute of Medicine (IOM) principles for the development of evidence-based guidelines. The document is available by clicking here and it also will be available at the National Guideline Clearinghouse (AHRQ).


Help Increase Awareness of Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes on Tuesday, March 25, 2014, the 26th Annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, and throughout the Year.

Each year the American Diabetes Association celebrates the fourth Tuesday in March as American Diabetes Association Alert Day®. All across America, the Association, its national sponsors, local organizations, and diabetes advocates encourage adults to find out if they might be at risk for type 2 diabetes by taking the Diabetes Risk Test.

This test asks users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history, and other potential risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Preventive tips are provided for everyone who takes the test, encouraging those at high risk to talk with their health care providers about whether they should be screened for diabetes. Such screening is critical to identifying adults who have prediabetes, who could be referred to National Diabetes Prevention Programs in their area. Screening can also identify adults who have type 2 diabetes that had not previously been diagnosed.

To learn more, click here for a fact sheet about the 26th Annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day® 2014.


American Diabetes Association, YMCA of the USA and American Medical Association Release New Cost Estimate on Federal Savings of the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act New Report Finds More Than $1.3 Billion in Savings Through Legislation

ALEXANDRIA, VA--(Marketwired - Feb 24, 2014) - The American Diabetes Association and YMCA of the USA (Y-USA), in collaboration with the American Medical Association (AMA), released important new research today examining HR 962/S 452, the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act (MDPA). The study, Estimated Federal Impact of the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act, conducted by Avalere Health, was commissioned by the three organizations to identify the federal government savings or cost burden of the legislation using methods similar to those of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). The research estimates the legislation would reduce federal spending by $1.3 billion over the 10-year budget window (2015-2024) and also reduce the incidence of diabetes among seniors.

"Coverage of diabetes prevention programs under Medicare will advance the fiscal health of our nation by reducing overall health care spending on diabetes," said John Anderson, MD, immediate past president, Medicine & Science, American Diabetes Association. "With the cost and prevalence of diabetes reaching unprecedented levels, there has never been a more critical time for Congress to support cost-effective, evidence-based programs that will improve the lives and health of America's seniors."

Currently, half of all Americans age 65 or older have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The MDPA will create a new benefit to provide coverage of the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) under Medicare. Programs like the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program and National DPP programs administered by other community organizations would be among the certified, evidence-based prevention programs covered by the legislation. Over the 10-year period, the estimated savings of $1.3 billion from the MDPA reflects lower Medicare spending due to the reduced incidence of diabetes during this period, resulting in fewer beneficiaries requiring certain medical interventions and services associated with the disease. With estimated savings growing over time, the study found even greater savings could accrue when looking beyond 2024.

To arrive at the estimated federal savings, the study used conservative assumptions grounded in the published literature and real-world experiences drawn from existing diabetes prevention programs. Based on those conservative assumptions, the study estimates an annual enrollment rate as low as 3 to 5 percent which would result in five million Medicare beneficiaries becoming enrolled in a diabetes prevention program by 2024. The study also estimates a 37 percent reduction in the cumulative incidence rate of diabetes over 10 years, resulting in nearly one million fewer cases of diabetes among seniors by 2024.

"As one of the nation's largest providers of diabetes prevention programs under the National Diabetes Prevention Program, the Y believes ensuring program coverage for high-risk older adults will not only improve their health, but also help reduce the burden of diabetes on the health care system," said Neil Nicoll, president and CEO, YMCA of the USA. "Based on our experience, as well as National Institutes of Health research, seniors benefit from the program even more than the general population."

Diabetes, a serious and life-threatening disease, has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. with nearly 26 million adults and children living with the disease. An additional 79 million have prediabetes, placing them at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The estimated total cost of diagnosed diabetes has skyrocketed to $245 billion annually. The findings from the study estimate the MDPA can help reduce this overwhelming financial burden by decreasing Medicare spending through reduced rates of diabetes among at-risk beneficiaries participating in diabetes prevention programs.

"With nearly 50 percent of our country's seniors at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, it is critical for seniors to have access to diabetes prevention programs. That is why the American Medical Association has made diabetes prevention a key part of our mission to help improve the health of the nation," said Ardis Dee Hoven, MD, president, American Medical Association. "We urge Congress to include diabetes prevention programs under Medicare coverage to help improve health outcomes for seniors and tackle this public health crisis that continues to strain our nation's health care system."

Avalere Health, a strategic health care advisory company, has extensive knowledge and expertise in evaluating the federal impact of legislation and in analyzing the relationship between health costs, in this case those related to diabetes, and the role of prevention. Avalere researched the connection between diabetes prevention programs and health care spending, relying on studies published in peer-reviewed journals and data from the CBO, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Avalere then used methods similar to those employed by the CBO to estimate how the MDPA could affect federal spending over the next 10 years.

The complete study is available here.


Medicare Diabetes Screening Project (MDSP) Report Highlights Six Years of Work; Contains Advocacy Recommendations

The Medicare Diabetes Screening Project (MDSP) has issued a report that provides details of the work of this coalition of more than 20 diabetes-interested organizations, over the past six years, in creating awareness of the benefits for diabetes screening that Medicare offers to those aged 65 and older.

The booklet gives a history of the community-based organizing and cooperative efforts that were undertaken in multiple states and communities across America, to help increase use of Medicare's diabetes screening benefit. These efforts were designed so that seniors with undiagnosed prediabetes and diabetes could be screened and get the help they needed to either prevent or delay the onset of diabetes, or to begin treatment that could help them prevent the many complications of the disease.

Some recommendations for advocacy are included in the booklet, such as:

  • Asking for increased and sustaining Congressional support for the National Diabetes Prevention Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and
  • Passage of the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act, which would make CDC-recognized diabetes prevention programs a covered benefit under Medicare.

DAA Welcomes the American Medical Association as its Newest Member

The DAA is proud to announce that as of December 12, 2013, the American Medical Association (AMA)became its 20th member, and will work with other DAA members to advocate for efforts to prevent or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes, and improve health outcomes for those diagnosed with diabetes.

In an April, 2013 news release, the AMA announced the first phase of its new Improving Health Outcomes initiative, committing resources, expertise and outreach to prevent heart disease and type 2 diabetes and to improve outcomes for those living with these diseases.

  • To address type 2 diabetes, the AMA is focusing on prediabetes, a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. The AMA is supporting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program, an evidence-based lifestyle change program that can help participants delay or halt the progression to type 2 diabetes. The CDC encourages physician referrals to community-based diabetes programs that have been recognized by the CDC, such as those offered by local Ys. The AMA has formed a strategic partnership with the YMCA of the USA, to help increase physician referrals to the Y's Diabetes Prevention Program. The partnership also aims to improve clinical-community linkages through bi-directional communication, so that patient information from community resources can be integrated into the physician's care plan.

Learn more from this AMA Wire™ article.


Advertisement in the New York Times on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2013

Twelve members of the DAA signed on to a full-page editorial advertisement that appeared in the November 14, 2013 edition of the New York Times. This advertisement, funded by DAA co-chair Novo Nordisk Inc., presented a strong case for why federal and state legislators and policymakers should make diabetes a national and local priority – right now. You can view this advertisement here.


Healthy People 2020 Spotlight on Health Webinar: Diabetes
Register Now | November 13, 2013 | 1:30–3:00 p.m. ET

Nearly 26 million people in the United States already have diabetes and another 79 million are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Healthy People 2020 and the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance held a webinar on Wednesday, November 13, 2013, as part of Healthy People 2020's "Spotlight on Health" series. This Webinar explored what is being done to prevent type 2 diabetes, including how clinical care and public health communities can work together and how communities are implementing evidence-based interventions to address diabetes prevention.

This Webinar featured:

  • Howard Koh, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Don Wright, M.D., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Carter Blakey, Deputy Director, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., Director, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Judith Fradkin, M.D., Director of the Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Disease at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
  • John Anderson, M.D., President, Medicine and Science, American Diabetes Association
  • Heather Hodge, M.Ed., Director, Chronic Disease Prevention Program, YMCA of the USA

The Diabetes topic area within Healthy People 2020 aims to reduce the disease and economic burden of diabetes mellitus (DM) and improve the quality of life for all persons who have, or are at risk for, DM. Learn more about Healthy People 2020 and Diabetes here.


Presidential Proclamation – National Diabetes Month, 2013

NATIONAL DIABETES MONTH, 2013

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

With more than 25 million Americans living with a diabetes diagnosis, and many more going undiagnosed, diabetes affects people across our country and remains a pressing national health concern. During National Diabetes Month, we renew our dedication to combating this chronic, life-threatening illness by standing with those living with diabetes, honoring the professionals and advocates engaged in fighting diabetes, and working to raise awareness about prevention and treatment.

With more than 25 million Americans living with a diabetes diagnosis, and many more going undiagnosed, diabetes affects people across our country and remains a pressing national health concern. During National Diabetes Month, we renew our dedication to combating this chronic, life-threatening illness by standing with those living with diabetes, honoring the professionals and advocates engaged in fighting diabetes, and working to raise awareness about prevention and treatment.

Diabetes can lead to serious complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Type 1 diabetes, often diagnosed in children, limits insulin production and its causes are not well defined. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for more than 90 percent of diabetes cases, has been linked to older age and family history, although it is increasingly being diagnosed in younger Americans and is associated with obesity and inactivity. The risk is particularly high among African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and some Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I encourage all Americans to talk to their health care provider about steps they can take to prevent or manage this disease.

With diabetes ranking among the leading causes of death in the United States, my Administration is committed to supporting Americans living with diabetes, investing in promising scientific research, advancing work toward improved treatment and care, and bolstering prevention efforts. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, beginning in 2014, no American with diabetes can be denied health insurance based on their diagnosis, and in most plans, Americans at increased risk can access diabetes screenings at no cost to them. The National Diabetes Prevention Program engages private and public partners to help people with prediabetes adopt lifestyles that can prevent or delay Type 2 diabetes, and the National Diabetes Education Program focuses on delaying and preventing disease onset while also working to improve outcomes for those living with the disease.

With our next generation in mind, First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative has taken on the staggering rise in childhood obesity our Nation has seen over the past three decades, and Let's Move! is empowering families and communities to put children on a path to healthier futures. Obese children face an increased risk of adult obesity and all the health risks that come with it, including Type 2 diabetes. By connecting children with healthy, affordable food options and the opportunity to be active in their communities, Let's Move! is helping our sons and daughters reach a healthier, more promising tomorrow.

This month, as we remember those we have lost to diabetes and support those living with the illness, let us look to a day with fewer cases of diabetes, a firmer understanding of the disease, and better outcomes for all those affected. By continuing the important research, outreach, and care delivery we have already begun, we know we can get there.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2013 as National Diabetes Month. I call upon all Americans, school systems, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, health care providers, research institutions, and other interested groups to join in activities that raise diabetes awareness and help prevent, treat, and manage the disease.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

BARACK OBAMA


AHRQ Statistical Brief -Diabetes with complications ranks among top 20 most expensive inpatient conditions.
August 2013

The August 2013 AHRQ Statistical Brief looked at most expensive inpatient conditions across payers in 2011. Diabetes with complications ranked in the top 20:

  • #16 at $5.4 billion annually across all payers
  • #19 for Medicare
  • #12 for Medicaid
  • #5 for Uninsured
  • Not in the top 20 for private pay

Medicare and Medicaid picked up most of that inpatient hospital tab — 63 percent, or $242.9 billion. Commercial insurers covered 29 percent, or $112.5 billion, while the remaining $17.1 billion went toward uninsured hospitalizations.

Read MoreRead full article here


New resources have been developed by the American Diabetes Association.
September 12, 2013

New resources have been developed by the American Diabetes Association. As you know, the Affordable Care Act includes a number of changes to improve access to health insurance for individuals and families and make coverage more affordable for people with diabetes.

For these new changes, the ADA has put together easy to understand information on the Health Insurance Marketplaces and updates to health insurance protections for persons with diabetes. These are also available in Spanish. They are available at: www.diabetes.org/HealthInsuranceUpdate2014 and www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/health-insurance/health_insurance-update.html.


To fix the budget, address diabetes
July 22, 2013

By Former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) and former Rep. Mike Castle (R-Del.) - 07/17/13 09:00 AM ET

If Congress is serious about addressing our long-range budget problems one imperative stands out: invest more in proven prevention efforts that can tackle costly chronic diseases and their complications. Indeed, one of the first steps toward fixing our budgetary issues is to focus on curbing the health care costs associated with these conditions. And, there aren't many efforts that can make a bigger impact on health care costs than expanding programs that have proven successful at stopping the incredible expansion of highly preventable and manageable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes.

One out of every eight dollars the U.S. government spends on healthcare goes to provide care for people with type 2 diabetes. The large majority of that spending is not for drugs to treat diabetes, but for the complications that come when patients aren't able to manage it effectively – serving as the gateway to blindness, heart attacks, strokes, liver disease and other serious impacts.

Read MoreRead full article here


Intensive Therapy Yields Long-Term Gain in Type 1 Diabetes
June 25, 2013

When results of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were announced in June 1993 at the American Diabetes Associations annual Scientific Sessions, the diabetes community finally had conclusive proof that lowering blood glucose as close to normal as possible in people with type 1 diabetes did, in fact, significantly reduce rates of the disease's serious small blood vessel complications (damage to the eyes, kidneys, and nerves).

Now, 20 years later at this year's ADA Scientific Sessions meeting, scientists announced preliminary results of a study that has followed DCCT participants since the conclusion of the DCCT, to assess any long-term impact of intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes. Called the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) trial, this study has now shown conclusively that yes, managing blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible in people with type 1 diabetes does significantly reduce rates of small blood vessel (microvascular) complications over time. The EDIC study is ongoing and is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Click here to read a news article from MedPage about the presentation of data at the ADA's recent meeting in Chicago.


How to Lower Your Risk of Diabetes
June 13, 2013

The YMCA has invented a cheap, successful program that teaches at-risk patients how to avoid the condition. Read full article from the National Journal here.


US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Draft Research Plan
May 10, 2013

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has announced its intention to once again review the scientific literature for evidence for screening for diabetes and prediabetes in asymptomatic adults (adults with no symptoms). The USPSTF last reviewed diabetes screening and issued its current recommendation in 2007-2008. DAA members believe this review is both timely and vital, given:

  • The ongoing rise in the number of new cases and overall prevalence of diabetes
  • Strong evidence of the value of diabetes prevention programs and early intervention in diabetes onset
  • Increased attention to prevention stimulated by the Affordable Care Act and efforts to reduce health care costs while improving patient outcomes and quality of care.
As a first step in the review process, the USPSTF posted (on May 2, 2013) its draft Research Plan on "screening for type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance." This Plan is available for review and public comment until May 29, 2013. Interested individuals and organizations can review the draft Research Plan and submit comments. DAA members believe that new evidence supportive of broader diabetes screening guidelines has come to light since the last USPSTF review in 2007-2008, and are pleased to provide input and support the USPSTF review process as it moves forward.


Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Diabetes Prevention Among Adherent Participants
March, 2013

American Journal of Managed Care publishes study that looks at the 10-year effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS) among adherent participants. They conclude that over 10 years, lifestyle intervention and metformin were cost-effective or cost saving compared with placebo. These analyses confirm that lifestyle and metformin represent a good value for money.

Read MoreRead full article here


Direct Association Between Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity Found
April 3, 2013

Obesity has been historically known as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and now a key mechanism has been found in the immune system that plays a part in the development of obesity-linked type 2 diabetes...

Read MoreRead full article here


American Diabetes Association® Alert Day®
March 26, 2013

The American Diabetes Association Alert Day is a one-day "wake-up call" asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Held on the fourth Tuesday of every March, this year's Alert Day will be held on Tuesday, March 26, 2013.

Read MoreRead full article here


American Diabetes Association Releases New Research Estimating Annual Cost of Diabetes at $245 Billion.
March 7, 2013

The American Diabetes Association (Association) released new research today estimating the total costs of diagnosed diabetes have risen to $245 billion in 2012 from $174 billion in 2007, when the cost was last examined.

Read More Read full article here


New First-ever Guidelines for Type 2 Kids
February 19, 2013

Step One – Start on insulin, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics which has issued guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes in children and teenagers aged 10 to 18....

Until recently, pediatricians have mostly had to deal with type 1 diabetes, which has a different cause and usually requires different management than type 2 diabetes. But, today, due largely to the rise in childhood obesity, as many as one in three children diagnosed with diabetes has type 2.

200TH ANNIVERSARY ARTICLE- THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE
The Past 200 Years in Diabetes

October 4, 2012

Diabetes was first recognized around 1500 B.C.E. by the ancient Egyptians, who considered it a rare condition in which a person urinated excessively and lost weight. The term diabetes mellitus, reflecting the fact that the urine of those affected had a sweet taste, was first used by the Greek physician Aretaeus, who lived from about 80 to 138 C.E. It was not until 1776, however, that Matthew Dobson actually measured the concentration of glucose in the urine of such patients and found it to be increased.1

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World Diabetes Day led by International Diabetes Federation is coming up on November 14.
CDC report.

October 24, 2012

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated every year on November 14. The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its member associations. It engages millions of people worldwide in diabetes advocacy and awareness. World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat that diabetes now poses. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2007 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public spotlight.
World Diabetes Day is a campaign that features a new theme chosen by the International Diabetes Federation each year to address issues facing the global diabetes community. While the themed campaigns last the whole year, the day itself is celebrated on November 14, to mark the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.

Diabetes Education and Prevention is the World Diabetes Day theme for the period 2009-2013.

Where is it celebrated?


World Diabetes Day is celebrated worldwide by the over 200 member associations of the International Diabetes Federation in more than 160 countries and territories, all Member States of the United Nations, as well as by other associations and organizations, companies, healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes and their families.

How is it marked?


The global diabetes community including International Diabetes Federation member associations, diabetes organizations, NGOs, health departments, civil society, individuals and companies develop an extensive range of activities, tailored to a variety of groups. Activities organized each year include:

  • Radio and television programmes
  • Sports events
  • Free screenings for diabetes and its complications
  • Public information meetings
  • Poster and leaflet campaigns
  • Diabetes workshops and exhibitions
  • Press conferences
  • Newspaper and magazine articles
  • Events for children and adolescents
  • Monument lightings
  • Human blue circles
  • Walks
  • Runs
  • Cycle Race
  • Political Events

Is there a theme?


Each year World Diabetes Day is centred on a theme related to diabetes. Topics covered in the past have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, and the costs of diabetes. Recent themes include:

2005: Diabetes and Foot Care
2006: Diabetes in the Disadvantaged and the Vulnerable
2007-2008: Diabetes in Children and Adolescents
2009-2013: Diabetes Education and Prevention

The World Diabetes Day logo

The World Diabetes Day logo is the blue circle - the global symbol for diabetes which was developed as part of the Unite for Diabetes awareness campaign. The logo was adopted in 2007 to mark the passage of the United Nations World Diabetes Day Resolution. The significance of the blue circle symbol is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle symbolizes life and health. The colour blue reflects the sky that unites all nations and is the colour of the United Nations flag. The blue circle signifies the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes pandemic.


Death rates dropped significantly last year for five out of the 15 leading causes of death in the U.S., according to a new
CDC report.

October 10, 2012

Researchers say a major decline in three of the top five causes of death, including heart disease, cancer, and stroke, contributed to a slight decline in the rate of overall deaths in 2011. However deaths caused by diabetes climbed 3.4%.

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DAA Members Thank Sen. Harkin for Doubling National Diabetes Prevention Program Funds in His Subcommittee's Appropriations Bill
August 13, 2012

"DAA members have offered "sincerest thanks" to Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), Chair of the Subcommittee on Labor, HHS, and Education Appropriations, for doubling funds for the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) in the 2013 fiscal year Labor, HHS, and Education Appropriation's bill. Funds were increased from $10 million in 2012 to $20 million in 2013.

The additional dollars will enable faster implementation of the National DPP by increasing the number and size of national networks that offer the program. The resources will also help the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to educate the general public and provider groups about the alarming rates of prediabetes in the US and alert them to the availability of the National DPP.

"In the coming weeks, we will be redoubling our efforts to urge Congress to provide the Senate funding level for this program as the FY 2013 appropriations process moves forward," the letter continued.

"We were also pleased that 72 Representatives signed onto a letter to the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Subcommittee on Labor, HHS, and Education Appropriations urging the committee to provide a minimum of $10 million for the National DPP," the letter added.

Read More See full letter here

We Can Prevent Traffic Deaths. Why Not Diabetes?
August 24, 2012

In an ad to appear in The New Republic's National Democratic and Republican Convention issue, a DAA ad poses the question: "We can prevent traffic deaths. Why not diabetes?" The ad features a large picture of a seatbelt. "If we can use public policy to change attitudes and behavior around using seat belts, we can use it to limit the societal costs of type 2 diabetes," the ad goes on to state.

In addition to reaching The New Republic's normal circulation, the publication in which the ad is featured will be delivered to the hotel rooms of all delegates attending both of the conventions. It also will be available to the media and at kiosks on the convention floors in both Charlotte and Tampa.

"Right now, there are nearly 26 million Americans with diabetes and another 79 million at risk of developing the disease," the ad states. "Implementing proven prevention methods could reduce the rate of diabetes and its complications, which would save thousands of lives and billions of dollars annually. Diabetes prevention is a smart investment."

Read More See full AD here

Diabetes Advocacy Alliance - Diabetes Screening: The Gateway to Prevention and Control
June 13, 2012

"How can screening for diabetes make a big impact on diabetes prevention and control?" Read the just released Diabetes Screening Brief from the DAA here.

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James Knickman's thoughtful essay in The Atlantic on why more research dollars are needed for prevention
May 31, 2012

James Knickman, President and CEO of the New York State Health Foundation, is an outspoken supporter of making investments in primary prevention of chronic disease.  In this thoughtful essay in The Atlantic, Mr. Knickman uses type 2 diabetes prevention as his example of what can be done to effectively, and cost effectively, prevent a major chronic disease.  He calls for more investment in research to address not only prevention of diabetes, but also other chronic diseases and conditions.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/05/we-should-be-in-a-race-for-prevention-not-cures/257657/

CDC promotes new online prediabetes risk test (in English and Spanish)
May 15, 2012

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently launched a new online tool to help people assess their risk for having prediabetes. The tool consists of seven brief questions that can be answered in less than a minute, and is available in English in the right-hand column of the home page for the National Diabetes Prevention Program. (http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/)

To read and take the test in Spanish, click here: http://www.cdc.gov/spanish/

People with prediabetes can often prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes if they lose a relatively small amount of weight and also increase their physical activity level to the equivalent of walking for 30 minutes, five times per week. The CDC has created the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) to help people with prediabetes achieve these goals. The YMCA of the USA, a DAA member, is partnering with the CDC in rolling out the NDPP in communities across America.
(http://www.ymca.net/diabetes-prevention/)

The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance supports the CDC in its efforts to expand the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP), so that as many as possible of the 79 million American adults with prediabetes can have access to places in their communities where they can learn how to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

The CDC offers information on locations where the NDPP is currently available.
(www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/index.htm)

Achieving funding for the NDPP is an ongoing DAA policy priority.
(http://www.diabetesadvocacyalliance.org/html/policy_evidence_based_diabetes_prevention.html)

DAA holds Changing the Course of Diabetes policy briefing on Capitol Hill

L-R: Bill Estabrook, Representative Mike Castle, Dr. Ken Thorpe, Rosa Rosen.

DAA holds Changing the Course of Diabetes policy briefing on Capitol Hill
March 26, 2012

In coordination with American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance was front and center at the Senate Visitors Center for the Congressional briefing, Changing the Course of Diabetes. Honorary Hosts included Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), and Senator Susan Collins (R-ME).

Former Co-Chair of House Diabetes Caucus, Representative Mike Castle (R-DE), moderated a panel discussion. The focus was on the growing diabetes epidemic, the need to know your risk, and the role of screening to avert, detect and appropriately manage the disease. Panelists included NY Based Diabetes Activist and Educator Rosa Rosen, Diabetes Educator and Activist; Ken Thorpe, Ph.D, Professor of Health Policy at Emory University; and Bill Estabrook, CEO, Ohio Police and Fire Pension Fund.

The briefing emphasized the need for appropriate diabetes screening guidelines as well as the need for government funding of the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP). Novo Nordisk, in partnership with the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance™, is advocating for $80 million in funding for the NDPP.

The panel discussion provided insight on the need for better government screening guidelines and funding for programming proven to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

"Type 2 diabetes is a national public health emergency that affects many American families. Its human and economic toll could devastate our health system, yet there are many ways we can prevent or delay this chronic disease" said Tekisha Everette, DAA Co-chair and Managing Director, Federal Government Affairs, American Diabetes Association. "Today's briefing was one way to strengthen our voice in Washington on behalf of every patient with diabetes."

SAVE the DATE
March 26, 2012

The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance and Honorary Hosts Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Susan Collilns (R-ME) will hold a policy briefing titled "Changing The Course of Diabetes" on Capitol Hill.

Read More Please click here to see the Save the Date announcement.

New Perspectives on Diabetes Screening Recommendation
January 10, 2012

In a press release issued today, the DAA supports arguments for expanded screening criteria for diabetes, made by scholars at The Lewin Group, in a peer-reviewed paper published in the January 2012 issue of Health Affairs.

The next time that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force takes up the topic of diabetes, the Lewin authors recommend consideration of new evidence and perspectives that support screening for diabetes based on multiple risk factors. The Lewin authors also propose a new paradigm for considering prevention of the onset of diabetes as a viable health outcome related to screening.

Their paper is entitled, "The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Should Broaden Its Diabetes Screening Recommendations to More High-Risk Groups."

Both the DAA press release, and the Lewin paper in Health Affairs, are available here.

Read More Read Health Affairs Paper Online  Read More Download Press Release

Rep. Ribble diabetes PSA
November 14, 2011

In a new public service announcement, Wisconsin Congressman Reid Ribble invites his constituents to learn more about diabetes during American Diabetes Month, commemorated each November.

Presidential Proclamation - National Diabetes Month
November 1, 2011

Each year, the diabetes community commemorates November as National Diabetes Month. This year, President Obama is lending his support for efforts to raise awareness of diabetes, in general, and of the importance of prevention and care.

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CDC Released a New Video
October 3, 2011

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a new 5-minute video on October 3, 2011, that tells the story of real people who have participated in a Y Diabetes Prevention Program in Kentucky. See how the National Diabetes Prevention Program is helping to change the way we treat prediabetes in America, and you'll know why the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance(TM) is advocating for funding of this evidence-based, community-based program.

HRCO Findings Brief
July 2011

Does medication adherence lower Medicare spending among beneficiaries with diabetes? A new study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization national program provides evidence that it does.

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Cash sought to prevent diabetes
POLITICO.com
July 25, 2011

Left unchecked, diabetes is a ticking time bomb of a disease in an individual's life. It's also a $3.4 trillion-a-decade threat to the nation's fiscal health and a huge driver of Medicare costs.

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HealthAffairs Blog
Bringing Diabetes Prevention To National Scale

July 20, 2011

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Diabetes Risk to 100 Million Demands U.S. Action: Tom Daschle
Bloomberg
January 28, 2011

Brace yourself. If you think nearly 26 million people currently living with diabetes in our country is a crisis, as many people do, what will we call it when the number equals the currently population of California, New York, Florida and Texas combined?

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Journalists and bloggers that are interested in learning more about the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance™, or are interested in an interview with one of the co-chairs of the DAA, should contact:

Amy Wotring
Diabetes Advocacy Alliance
amy@diabetesadvocacyalliance.com